If I was Your Girl by Meredith Russo

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As promised, I’m finally talking about the book I read most recently, called If I was Your Girl by Meredith Russo. This book is about a transgender girl who moves to live with her father in Tennessee after being assaulted. She transitioned as a teenager, and passes very well, but she is still coming to terms with being a girl and living the life she wants to live. She meets new friends in her new school, and even meets a boy that she likes, but she doesn’t tell anyone that she is transgender. She worries that if she does tell her new friends or boyfriend that they will react the way that other people she knows have reacted and she will get hurt again.

I really find stories like this interesting, and have read a couple other similar books in the past. But this one was a little bit different, in that Amanda has already fully transitioned at the start of the story. There are a few flashbacks to events during and before her transition, but the bulk of the plot takes place in the present. So the story shows her trying to make friends and fit in, to really experience what it’s like to be a girl and have friends and a boyfriend, since this is all new for her.

One thing that I thought was really cool is that this book is actually written by a transgender woman. That’s not to say that stories like this must be written by someone who has directly experienced the difficulties they write about. Writers are definitely capable of doing enough research to write competently about their subject matter. Of course, this is a very general statement, and some writers write more authoritatively than others just as some books are better written than others. But what I’m saying is that I feel like writers who have some experience with what they’re writing about can bring a really interesting perspective to stories of this nature.

However, after reading the book, I read the author’s note at the end, which changed my opinion a little bit. In the author’s note, Russo talked about how she decided to write Amanda as a transgender girl who passed very well and who was able to transition at a younger age than might realistically be possible. This gave me a little bit of pause. Not that I wanted the character to have it harder than she already did, as unfortunately tends to be the reality for many transgender people. I just expected that the story would feel more realistic since it was written by a woman who could better share the experiences of transgender women. Maybe that’s too much to ask from a YA novel, and maybe the writer just wanted to make Amanda more relatable to readers, but I was a little bit disappointed.

Despite that, I thought this was an interesting take on a transgender coming of age story. While it wasn’t the best book I’ve ever read, nor was it the best book on this subject matter that I’ve read, I think it was still worth reading. Stories like this one are important to read, since they broaden our understanding of people who aren’t like ourselves, and don’t share our experiences.

Has anyone else read this book or any other books like it? What do you think of this subject matter? Let me know in the comments.

Happy reading!

Alyss

(photo courtesy of Goodreads)

Welcome to my new blog!

Hi everyone, I’m not new to blogging, but I am new to this URL. I used to have a blog over at www.sweaterslettersandlibrarybooks.wordpress.com. You can go and check it out if you want to see any of my old posts. But I’ve decided to rebrand slightly, and due to some domain technicalities I’ve created a new blog here. The content will still be familiar to those of you who followed me over there, just in a new place. If you’re so inclined, please make sure to follow me here at my new blog address to make sure that you see all of my new posts.

I’m really hoping to start out on a new blogging limb here and post more often. So I’d really appreciate your following, liking, and commenting.

Thanks, everyone! It feels good to be back!

Alyss